Psychological Analysis of a (Swindon) Patient with Asperger Syndrom

Here I want to present an analysis concerning a patient with Asperger Syndrom. I´m his para-professional and mentor at school so I know how difficult it is and how many problems a person with Asperger Syndrom has.
Asperger Syndrom is a form of autism and a life-long disability. For relevant people it´s very difficult to understand other peoples thoughts or feelings. They quickly can be overpowered and this causes fear. People with this syndrom -and also my patient- find most things very confusing. In addition they love order and routines and they strictly follow their plans.
But people with Asperger Syndrom are not stupid, because they have about the same IQ as normal people. Very often they are experts in maths and physics. In many cases such people have special interests, like my patient: He loves astronomy.

Things, that an “Asperger child” doesn´t like:

  • bright light
  • metaphors or jokes
  • strangers
  • touch
  • lies
  • shouting
  • facial expressions (because they don´t understand them)
  • changes (because everything has to be in order).

As you see, it´s very hard to keep these things in mind everytime, to come up to an Asperger patient. But you also could do something to make life easier for this people.

For example:

  • If he´s angry with you, don´t shout at him! Take a deep breath and think about your  reactions.
  • If you don´t understand something, just ask
  • Make relationships between things (compare things so that could understand it better)
  • Use short, logical and easy sentences
  • Don´t show, that he is different from you; tread him/her like a normal guy.
  • Everything has to be in the same order.
  • He/She should have a routined school day.
  • and so on…

These are the most important facts about this disability and ways, how to master it. With this new information you will be able to understand those people, handle such a situation and be pleased.

Yours sincerely,

Siobhan

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